More fun weathering the 00 Gundam SD

Last time, we had finished chipping this gundam, which gave me an interesting base coat. However, I still wanted to kick the weathering up yet another notch and try out some new techniques.

Panel lining and edge highlighting

If you’re going to be doing panel lining and edge highlighting with a brush, paint consistency is key. You want the paint to be fairly thin so it will flow smoothly off your brush. If you have to apply any pressure at all, that’s where your line starts to gets either wiggly or you start getting inconsistent line width.

You will obviously need to do some experimentation to see exactly how much and with what you should thin your paints. However, this is a case where a wet palette is really important, just so however much that is, you can maintain the paint consistency for more than the few minutes it takes for acrylic paints to start drying. I’ve found that a touch of airbrush flow improver helps when thinning for this purpose, and if you want to maintain the pigment density, using an ink instead of water as a thinning medium can allow you to get a paint down to a really thin consistency but keep the colours intense.

Some people avoid thinning their paints because they are afraid that too much paint will come off their brush, causing a big pool the second they touch the model. However, there is a simple solution to that – simply remove the excess with either your palette or a paper towel and you’re ready to roll.

Also, I shouldn’t have to say this, but consider busting out either a natural hair liner brush or one of your fancy Kolinsky sables for this. This is detail work and needs a good brush.

So, with my 10/0 natural hair liner brush, I dropped some very thin black paint into the panel lines. From there, I moved onto edge highlights, using a Raphael 8404 size 1 and my highest highlight colour. Where the corner was sharp enough to allow me to use the side of the brush rather than the tip, I did that. Also, on the edge highlights, I skipped over areas that were chipped away for obvious reasons.

More weathering

With the panel lines and edge highlighting in, it was time for some more weathering. With my 10/0 liner, I painted on some scratches and chips, painting a dark line over a light line to make a pseudo-3D scratch with paint. With a few additional chips and scratches painted in, it was time to hit it with one last coat of varnish, if only to protect that second layer of chipping medium from moisture.

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Additional weathering with acrylics

After the varnish dried, I did a little sponge chipping with a metallic silver colour. While I had initially started with Vallejo Metal Color Steel, I felt that somewhere between all the layers of rust, paint, chipping medium, and varnish, any metallic effect had long since been obliterated. So, a little sponge chipping here and there, focusing on raised corners, helped bring that back.

Finally, it was time to try something new. I had picked up a bunch of random old tubes of artist oil paints from a fellow IPMS member a few months ago, and thought it was time to try using oils for weathering.

These artist oil paints have some properties that are very different from the acrylics I am used to, which can make them very useful for certain techniques. The main difference is the dry time; oil paints can stay wet for hours, if not days, while acrylics only give you a limited window with which to work. That’s why you sometimes get coffee staining with acrylic washes – if it’s not laid down perfectly consistently, it can pool and dry funnily. While with oil paints, you have more time to play with it once it’s on the model and get it exactly how you want it before it dries.

Since this is my first time using oil paints, I decided to just dip my toe in. I put a few browns and blacks and ochres and whatnot onto some paper towel and let the paper towel soak up some of the linseed oil for a couple hours (which I’m told is important if you ever want the paint on the model to dry) and then went to work. To do my streaking, I would use a technique that is actually pretty similar to Privateer Press’ two brush blending. With one brush, I would put a little dot of oil paint at the origin of my streak. Then, with a second brush loaded with a little bit of paint thinner (odorless, of course, in true Bob Ross style), I’d drag that dot down, pulling the paint and thinner mixture downwards like a streak of rust or an oil leak.

I was actually quite happy with the effect. While oil paints are a little more involved than acrylics – they can’t be thinned with water, they take a long time to dry, and if you want to get the linseed oil out you need to plan your painting a couple hours in advance – once you get brush to model, they are actually fairly easy to use for this application. While I will be going deeper into the world of oils, that may be more for display models as Agrax Earthshade and Typhus Corrosion is probably good enough if I’m trying to bang out a tabletop quality model in advance of the next tournament (who am I kidding, I haven’t been to a tournament in months).

Conclusion

This model is all about experimentation with something new. I was initially skeptical about them as it seemed like it would be more difficult than the acrylic paints I’m used to. While there was a little more setup and cleanup to do, and I did have to put the model on the shelf overnight to let the paints dry, I am definitely going to do more experimentation with this medium.

Tune in next time while I discuss how I did the eyes, the glowing sword, and the gun.

Want some chips with that Gundam?

This past year, despite knowing absolutely nothing about Japanese cartoons, I’ve been trying out Gunpla, or Gundam Plastic Modelling, and have found it to be quite enjoyable. Gundam models are kind of unique in the sheer creativity that one can apply to them. There are many different ways to approach a Gundam project, from a cartoonish style to an automotive candy coat to a hyper-realistic weathered model, and all are equally valid.

So, after doing two high grades — a Zaku and a Gundam — I decided to mix things up and bang out the 00 Gundam SD model that had made it into my stash courtesy of a coworker who was into the franchise but evidently less into the modelling aspect.

The SD series, or Super Deformed, are basically the egg planes or toon tanks of the Gundam universe. With big heads and short stubby limbs, they look like cute chibi versions of regular Gundams. The kits are even more simple than the High Grades, with fewer parts and fewer points of articulation. For example, the arms on this kit are just a couple pieces and the elbows don’t articulate. This doesn’t really bother me because I tend to want to get the assembly over and done with so I can start painting, and I don’t really care all that much about articulation.

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The kit

Because it’s Bandai, assembly was fairly simple and straightforward. There were a few seam lines to fix up and one or two areas which were hollow on the kit and needed a bit of filling, but it was all relatively painless. The kit does come with multiple configurations for weapons loadout; I ended up settling on a pistol and a sword, and I did fill in a couple sockets on the skirts for holding weapons because I didn’t like the look.

In this case, I knew I wanted to paint it just because I’m all about the paint. I figured that it would be fun to really go overboard on the weathering, because it would be a fun juxtaposition between the cute, chibi model and a finish that is ridiculously over the top on the grittiness and battle damage.

As usual, I started with a zenithal prime with black and white Stynylrez. With these Gundam kits, I find it’s easier to pop the arms, legs and head off, prime them black, then put them back together in your intended pose before hitting it with the white. I chose a pose with the head turned to the left, looking in the same direction as the barrel of the gun. The primary light source was placed coming from the upper front right quadrant; this generates a little more interest as one half of the face would be in light and the other half would be shadowed. I’m not sure the zenithal prime was completely necessary as I’ve probably wiped out any preshading effects with my multi-layer chipping, but I’ve found it to be a good initial step regardless as doing a zenithal and taking a few photos can really help my understanding of how light and shadow interact with the model.

Of hairspray and chips

Having tried out the hairspray chipping method earlier this year on some terrain, I decided to kick it up a notch. For those who don’t know, the idea behind the hairspray chipping method is that you paint the model with the colour you intend for the chips to be, varnish it, apply a chipping medium (either specific hobby products or hairspray) and paint your main paint colour overtop all of that. Once that second coat of paint is dried, you can spray some water onto it. That water will soak through the acrylic paint in the second layer and into the chipping medium, where it will reactivate it. With that underlying area reactivated, you can chip away chunks of the top layer of paint with a stiff brush and expose the underlying paint colour.

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Cross section of a model with hairspray chipping.

The advantages to this technique should be obvious. You’re basically chipping away paint on the model, similar to how paint on the real thing would actually chip and flake off as it gets beat up. You can get a very interesting look, different from either sponge weathering or painting on your chips. And, while it does take a little extra time with the multiple layers (though if you know how to use your airbrush, it’s not that bad), once you pull out your toothbrush and go at it, you can chip away large surfaces in no time flat.

So, for the first layer, I took the thing apart again and sprayed it with Vallejo Metal Color steel, VMC being the only metallic paint that goes through my airbrush. Next, I followed up by spraying a few random browns and oranges here and there in a random pattern, just so there would be some variation in the rust colour on different areas of the model.

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Rusty Gundam

Finally, I took a big, stiff brush and some Citadel Ryza Rust and just dabbed, stippled, and dry-brushed this all over. Ryza Rust is a bright orange and is one of Citadel’s dry paints, which are very thick, goopy paints designed for dry brushing. While they are often maligned — after all, it’s not that hard to dry brush with regular paints — it is pretty good for this sort of application where you just want random rust patterns. That said, I suspect that artist heavy body acrylics would be pretty similar and much more economical than the Citadel dry paints, and don’t come in one of the worst paint posts known to man, so I’ll probably head to the art store rather than the FLGS next time I need more.

 

With the first layer done, I varnished it with some Reaper brush on sealer through the airbrush, then sprayed some Vallejo Chipping Medium over the whole thing. However, instead of going straight to my top colour, I had an idea. Like in our models, real-life vehicles are primed before they are painted. I figured that it would add another layer of interest if I had some of the chipping go down to the primer, while other chips would go all the way down to the metal.

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Zinc Chromate primer (Army Painter Sulfide Ochre) chipped away

As such, I picked up some Sulfide Ochre from Army Painter, which resembled the yellow-green zinc chromate primer that was commonly used on a lot of military vehicles, at least until they found out how carcinogenic it was. I sprayed the whole model with it, needing at least two thin coats to get good coverage, then randomly chipped away about half of it.

 

After another coat of varnish to protect my work and then another layer of chipping medium, it was time to hit it with the actual base colour. I knew the weapons and fists would stay in a gunmetal colour, and there were details such as the eyes that I would have to do with the brush, so I didn’t worry about painting or chipping those, but I figured I would do a two-tone scheme for the rest of the model.

Paint time

Being elbow deep in brightly coloured fantasy models, I hadn’t done many “realistic” colours in a while. So, I decided to go with a green and khaki scheme, partly because I had some Reaper MSP triads in my stash for both an army green and a khaki colour. Reaper tends to group their paints into “triads” where you can get a shadow, base, and highlight colour, which is really useful for beginners. In this case, I had the Terran Khaki (Terran Khaki, Khaki Shadow, and Khaki Highlight) and Olive Green (Olive Green, Muddy Olive, and Pale Olive) triads.

That said, I wasn’t completely enthused with the triads for these colours. When I paint greens, I like to have a cool to warm transition from the shadows to the highlights, and these colours didn’t seem to have much of that. The green in particular didn’t seem to have much change in hue; instead it looked like they just added white to the base colour to create the highlight. So, when I was spraying, I added a drop of their Blue Liner, a dark blue-black, to the two shadow colours just to deepen the shadows a little. Further, for the greens, instead of using the supplied highlight colour, I added yellow to the base colour to make a warmer highlight.

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Paints used

I sprayed the Khaki first, again, using a similar procedure as I did for the zenithal prime. I would disassemble the gundam, spray the entire thing in the shadow colour, making sure I get good coverage, then reassemble it and start working up. This allows me to both make sure I don’t miss a spot, but also with it reassembled and in its intended pose, it’s much easier to figure out exactly where to place shadows and highlights. I took it apart again, did a little masking, and repeated the process for the green.

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Finally, there were a few areas that I wanted black. They weren’t particularly large, so I brush painted them on, using my usual cool black highlight colours. Generally, when I’m painting black, I have a little formula that starts with a pure black, and gets highlighted up to Reaper’s Blue Liner, P3 Gravedigger Denim, and P3 Frostbite. Using a combination of blending and glazes, I made a fairly smooth transition with the brush that didn’t involve a lot of masking and an airbrush. I felt that while I wanted them to be nice, the transitions didn’t have to be perfect because even if my blend wasn’t completely smooth, the weathering and chipping would either cover it up or draw attention away from it.

Now, with my beautiful paint job all done and the right highlights and shadows, I sprayed all the pieces with water and chipped it once more, revealing both the zinc chromate primer and the rusted metal underneath.

Next Steps

While the model was starting to come together at this point, there was still a lot to be done. Panel lines and edge highlights, as well as some additional post-chipping weathering. Finally, there are a few details that need to be done — the eyes, the sword, and the gun — which are to be done with completely different techniques than the rest of the model. As this is starting to run long, I’ll try to address those in a follow up article.

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The model, after chipping and some additional weathering steps

 

 

Paintlog: Ill-conceived conversions and fun with photoetch

It’s been about a month or two since my last paintlog, and if I had to give November a theme, it would be conversions and kitbashes. Possibly ill-conceived and overly-ambitious conversions and kitbashing, but conversions and kitbashing nonetheless.

Greylord Outriders

These are models that have been sitting on the shelf of shame for at least two years. I remember when I first got them, I quickly slapped three or so of them together, and did some conversion work on the other two, messing around with green stuff and alternate heads to add to the gender diversity of this unit. I also sculpted some snowball like things coming out of their hands to represent the magic spells that they cast. These were just paper clips with an extended teardrop shape sculpted in green stuff, then textured by dragging a hobby knife along the length of the item. Drill a hole in the hands, pop the paper clip in, and call it a day.

Then, they rested on my shelf for at least two years. When I resolved to clear off my shelf of shame (that is, my shelf where I put all my assembled but unpainted models), these guys were some of the last that I got to, mostly because I don’t really like painting cavalry, and partly because they don’t exactly fit my army tactics-wise.

When it came time to paint them, I decided to start by using the airbrush as much as I could to bang out the bulk of the actual horses, then paint the riders and details such as the saddles, harnesses, and mane with a brush. After applying black primer and a zenithal highlight, I got to work, initially starting with a mixture of a dark brown and Reaper’s Blue Liner, which is essentially a blue-black that seems to have been originally formulated for doing darklining on blue surfaces like the armour of a space marine. Of course, the blue was chosen over black because colour theory.

From there, I worked up to the  highlights, spraying from above and going from brown to a slightly reddish leather colour, and mixing in a touch of P3 Menoth White Highlight (one of my go-to off-whites) into the highest highlight. When I was satisfied with the horses, at least for a tabletop quality miniature that I wanted off my shelf and in my display case with the rest of my army, I moved on to brush painting everything else. Finally, I did bust out the airbrush again to do quick OSL effects on the magic spells and a couple other little things. I may have gone slightly overboard with the blue glow, but they’re spell-slinging cavalry, so who cares?

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Honestly, some of the green stuff work is a little rough and there are a couple places where the paint was a little quick and dirty and my blends weren’t perfect, but it’s good enough for tabletop and it’s got me closer to having a completely empty shelf of shame.

Vlatka Tzepesci, Great Princess of Umbrey

IMG_1085.JPGAnd, speaking of ill-conceived gender-bent cavalry models, I’ve decided to put my own spin on Vladimir Tzepesci, Great Prince of Umbrey (Vlad3) as well, kitbashing his horse and weaponry with Alexia’s body and head to make my own special version. The horse is basically stock, aside from some gap filling here and there.

As these were both metal models, this process involved a lot of filing to make Alexia fit on the horse designed for Vlad, and make sure that Vlad’s cape fits on her. It was a bit of a pain because cutting, filing and pinning metal models gets real obnoxious real fast. I did a little but of sculpting, using various epoxy putties to sculpt some transitions on places like the cape where the two pieces from two models not designed to ever go together met, and sculpted a cloth hanging down on one side of the saddle to cover up some rough areas where she didn’t quite fit that nicely on the horse. I also, of course, had to sculpt on some big shoulder pads because if there is one thing Vlad is notorious for, it’s oversized shoulder pads that put GW’s Space Marines to shame. I did keep it somewhat restrained though for both aesthetics and versimilitude, not that a model of someone riding a horse while simultaneously wielding a spear and a flail makes any sense on any level whatsoever. Finally, the weapons involved a lot of pinning with very tiny pins because they are small metal pieces that will break off if you breath on them the wrong way, and the shaft of the spear was replaced with a brass rod because leaving it in pewter is just asking for trouble.

In the end, between the reposing of the spear and the elevated base I constructed for this model, I think she is taller than a stock colossal. I know this is going to cause headaches if I ever bring her to a tournament, but that’s one thing that I almost never worry about.

Chibi Gundam

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I’ve also started on an SD Gundam, which is basically the Toon Tank of the Gundam universe. I’ve decided that with the deformed, cutesy shape, it would be interesting to contrast that with lots of weathering. I’ve started off with the hairspray technique in two layers. After priming with Synylrez, I started with the metal and rust layer. I sprayed the entire model with Vallejo Metal Color Steel, then sprayed, stippled and dry-brushed some various tones of brown and orange on there. I varnished that, then picked out a colour that roughly resembles the yellow primer you see on planes and other military equipment from the Army Painter rack at my FLGS. After applying the varnish and chipping medium, I chipped away at it, trying to get about half of the primer off. The idea is that when I chip the top coat, some of the chips will show primer, while some of the chips will go all the way to the metal.

I haven’t quite decided what colours I will paint this in yet, though I’m leaning towards a green and khaki scheme. I’d like to really push the weathering; in addition to doing the double layer chipping for the first time and using my usual techniques of sponging and painting on scratches, I was thinking of trying out oils, streaking products, and really play around with dry pigments.

Flag Statue

IMG_1079.JPGI also figured that for Warmachine, I need a third flag model to act as an objective now that three-flag scenarios are a thing again. However, I’ve already exhausted both Khador standard bearers, so it was time to do a conversion. I took a Kossite Woodsman leader, a flag from a Man-O-War, some pins and a brass tube and made myself a third unique flag. I also used the same Reaper base as my last ones, and will end up using the same painting tactic to make it look like an old bronze statue.

Fortunately, I remembered to take the picture halfway through brush priming with Reaper, so you can see the use of brass tube to replace the flagpole. Now that it’s all primed, he shouldn’t take more than a few minutes to paint through heavy use of dry-brushing and Citadel’s Nihilakh Oxide technical paint.

Me-109B

And now for something completely different, with the successful completion of my PZL 23 project, I’ve decided to embark on a more ambitious scale aircraft, AMG’s Me-109B in 1:48 scale. I don’t have a lot of recent experience with model aircraft kits, but this is definitely more complicated than my last work in that medium, as well as the model kits that I would build in my childhood.

This kit includes lots of advanced features in the box such as photo-etch parts, and is of a sufficiently obscure subject that I can’t imagine that very much aftermarket bling would be either necessary or even available for the more discerning modeller.

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Interior, just prior to joining the two halves of the fuselage

And speaking of photo-etch, that stuff can die in a fire. For the uninitiated, photo-etch are very tiny parts, made through the use of a photographic etching process on a thin brass sheet. This allows for smaller and more detailed parts than is possible with either plastic or resin, which can be both a blessing and a curse. Further, it is not uncommon to have to bend parts into the shape required, such as with the map case on the side of the cockpit. It’s not so bad when it’s just gluing a sheet to a flat piece of plastic, but when you start having to bend it and make complex shapes, it gets real obnoxious real fast.

Fortunately, most of the photoetch is cockpit detail, and now that I’ve got the cockpit in place and by some miracle the two halves of the fuselage actually went together fairly nicely. I think the plan is going to be work on filling seams for the time being, as well as getting some of the sub-assemblies together to glue on once that is done. I’m hoping to get it together fairly quickly, as I have a unique colour scheme in mind and I’m getting antsy to start airbrushing.

Secret project

I do have one more project on the go; though I shared some pictures with a few people, I’m keeping it under wraps for the moment until I’m done. Suffice it to say, it is a very expensive and very involved conversion that involves a lot of plasticard and milliput. And a lot of filing and sanding resin, which is always a task that requires care because that’s some stuff you really don’t want in your lungs.

Next Steps

Right now, I’ve eliminated my shelf of shame, however I have a lot of projects on the bench. I’ve been keeping them organized by using halves of boxes as trays, however it would be nice to clear off a couple and bring my WIP queue down to a more manageable level. But, on the other hand, a coworker is interested in a Warmachine demo, so I think I may pivot to that Cygnar battlebox I have kicking around. I know, it’s Cygnar, but someone has to be the bad guys.

 

 

Painting my Grolar, Part 3

In a previous article, we got our Grolar almost completed, putting down all the paint and getting it ready for the final few steps — weathering, basing, and a coat of varnish to protect it from grubby gamer hands.

Weathering

In general, weathering techniques are a more recent addition to my hobby repertoire.  It was only this year that I really dove into weathering. Initially, I tried to justify not doing it by saying that my warjacks were fresh out of the factory, but once I got into it, I started to really like the results.

For this model, I used four main techniques.

  1. Painted on scratches
  2. Sponge Weathering
  3. Add texture with Typhus Corrosion
  4. Dry pigments

Painted on scratches

Painting on scratches is not very complicated, however it does require a fine brush and some brush control. But before I get into how to paint it, lets imagine a plate of armour that has taken a whack from a sword or a battleaxe or something like that and consider how it will interact with the light.

In my sketch here, we have a green plate of armour with a scratch halfway up and a light source coming from the top left. Due to the geometry of the scratch, the bottom part of the scratch is going to catch the light, while the top part of the scratch is going to be shadowed.

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Left, the plate of armour with the scratch, right, the plate of armour with the top and bottom of the highlight to illustrate.

So, once we understand this, painting a cool looking scratch is going to be fairly simple, as long as you have the brush control and the right brush and paint consistency. Simply paint a dark colour for the body of the scratch, and add a thin highlight on the bottom of the scratch in a lighter version of your base colour.

This technique may not be the most accurate on a micro scale; after all, most armour plates have relatively thin green paint and relatively thick silver metal to them, and these sort of scratches will probably dig deep into the metal, the juxtaposition of the bright highlight and the dark shadow will give your scratch a three dimensional look, which is exactly what we are going for here.

Also, when it comes to scratches, random scratches are nice, but you can get some extra realism by considering what areas are going to take a beating, and in what direction these scratches are likely to form. As one example, I used to work on construction sites, and I remember once staring at the back end of an excavator. The main body of an excavator can swivel 360 degrees on its tracks, and the back end sticks out fairly far to act as a counterweight to the bucket on the front. This particular excavator had a lot of horizontal scratches on the back, which, in context, totally makes sense. As the body of the excavator swivels around on its tracks and the operator is going to be more focused on the bucket than the back end, sooner or later, that back end is going to rub up against something and the body spins around, it’s going to leave horizontal scratches on the back of the excavator.

So in our fantasy world, if you have something like a warjack that is going to do a lot of punching, you can make the weathering look a little more realistic by adding some scratches extending back from the fists in the direction of the punch. This sort of thing can add a little more realism to your scratches, and make it so that your weathering tells a story, or at least more of a story than “here are some scratches and stuff I painted on this model.”

Sponge Weathering

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Sponge weathering is another simple technique, and it uses something that any wargamer has kicking around in droves — soft foam. You can get this in packaging for Privateer Press miniatures, or from pieces that you’ve plucked from those trays for your battlefoam bag. Simply break off a piece of your pluck foam, or cut off a piece of the foam that comes in the PP blister packs, and you’ve got your applicator.

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See the scratches on areas like the shoulder and the fist, as well as the sponge weathering  and Typhus Corrosion all over.

All you have to do with this technique is take the foam, add some paint, remove the excess with a paper towel, similar to what you do when dry-brushing, and start dabbing the model in areas that you want a weathered, chipping effect. This will apply your paint in random, natural patterns that look sort of like the chipping you might expect to see on a military vehicle that has been in service for a while. I like to start with a dark silver colour, such as GW’s Leadbelcher or P3’s Pig Iron, then follow up with a dark brown like P3 Umbral Umber. By doing two colours, not only do I get a bit of a rust effect, with some of the chips looking like they’ve been exposed to the elements longer than others, but it also just adds some visual interest and confusion to trick the eye into making it look a little more real.

Typhus Corrosion

Typhus Corrosion is one of Games Workshop’s technical paints, which is a few paints in their line that have been specially formulated to make some more advanced techniques rather easy. For example, they have Blood for the Blood God, which makes basic blood effects simple, or Nihilakh Oxide which is basically just that greenish patina that you see on old statues put in a tiny bottle.

citadeltechnical.jpgTyphus Corrosion comes in their standard tiny pot, and when you open it, you can see that it is a thin paint, with a consistency somewhat closer to a wash, but with a bunch of crud floating in it. This crud creates a gritty texture when it dries, which helps create some contrast and visual confusion, as well as not doing a terrible job of replicating mud and grime.

Duncan can probably explain this better than I can, but to apply this, you simply put in on the desired area with a beater brush that you don’t really care about. For warjacks, I like to add a lot to the legs and feet, to replicate both the mud that they may have walked through. From there, you can add as much or as little as you want, playing with dabs, stippling, and streaks, to get the desired effect. For warjacks, I think it gives a particularly nice result on the pistons and other machinery that articulates the legs, to replicate buildups of grease and oil and grime. Also, feel free to add some on top of the areas that you had hit with the sponge weathering for a cool effect as well.

Dry pigment

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Some subtle soot on the back of this warjack

We’re just about done here, but there is one more thing to consider. In this steampunk universe, warjacks are fueled by giant coal boilers, which is something that you really shouldn’t think about too hard, given the sheer impracticality of managing the logistics of delivering enough coal to the battlefield to keep even a single warjack going. However, if you’re burning the entire coal production of West Virginia every couple hours, that’s going to generate a lot of soot.

This is where our friend dry pigments come in. These are simply bottles of pigment dust, with no liquid or medium in them. They can be brushed onto the model to create various effects, and I’ve found them to be particularly useful for a few things — adding a bit of colour and visual interest to rocks and brickwork, or in this case, adding soot. They can be applied in a couple of ways, either by simply getting some on your brush and dusting the model with them, or, if you want to get a little more to stick, adding a little bit of water (or saliva) to the model and then brushing them on. Again, this is a product that is very new to me, but I’ve found that brushing the smokestacks, boiler, etc., with some very dark grey or black pigment can really help make it look like it’s coated in a fine layer of soot.

That said, because this is simply dust that you are applying to the model, you will need to fix the pigment somehow to make it stick. Some companies make pigment fixers, but for gaming pieces, I feel like the varnish that I use to protect them on the tabletop (Vallejo Matte Varnish, thinned and shot through an airbrush) is good enough to seal the pigment onto the model.

Anyways, from there, it’s just a matter of adding the glow effect onto the visor, doing some basing, and adding a coat of varnish, and the Grolar is done and ready for the gaming table.

Final thoughts on weathering

Since I’m still building my weathering skills, this is just a tiny sample of some basic weathering techniques. There are many chipping techniques, such as with hairspray or salt, that I’ve yet to try. In addition, you can do a lot with oil paints to create glazes and other visual interest. Oil paints are a completely different beast because they have a lot longer work time than acrylics, which opens up a lot of techniques, however that’s something that I haven’t really gotten into yet because of cleanup and ventilation concerns. Further, there are a wealth of specialized weathering products out there from companies like Vallejo and AK, including a few I just picked up last week (oh, the dangers of having a doctor’s office a couple blocks away from a hobby store…).

One thing I would recommend to all the gamers out there, though, is to check out some of the hobby stores and scale model builder communities if you really want to take your weathering to the next level. Hobby stores tend to have a lot more products for this sort of thing than the six or so GW technical paints that your FLGS might have on its shelf, and the sort of people who spend hours getting their Panzers looking like they’ve been going through Russian mud and snow (and the occasional chunk of shrapnel) have a lot of expertise you can borrow from.

Black Dragon Spriggan Paintlog

So, in my efforts to bash out the backlog on my shelf of shame, I managed to finish off my Spriggan that had been sitting there since, well, since Spriggans were considered to be one of Khador’s best warjacks.

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For me, this model was a study in freehand and weathering.  I stuck to my usual purple and pink colour scheme with the autumnal colours in the basing.  To be honest, when I started, I didn’t think it would end up looking this good.

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I bought this model used, and had to strip some paint off, and of course, broke the spindly little arms off in the process and had to reconstruct them.  Then I primed it white and hit it with the purple base coat using an old Badger single-action airbrush.  My purple recipe is simply the Reaper Royal Purples triad of Nightshade (9022), Imperial (9023) and Amethyst (9014) purple, which with the right mixture of Vallejo airbrush thinner and flow improver, shoots through the brush pretty well.  Start with the darkest colour and work your way up, occasionally using a business card or a bit of silly putty for masking and to prevent overspray, and you’re in business.

Then it sat on the shelf for a year.

Of course, when I picked it back up, I noticed that there were a lot of issues with the model, as I had gotten a little better at painting in the meantime.  I had missed a lot of mold lines the first time around, and my first attempt at recreating the arms was not great.  There was some cleanup involved, but I didn’t want to have to respray the model, so I kept my cleaning to places where I was going to paint over anyways, or where I could easily conceal my scratching at it.

I also ripped off the arms to make it easier to paint and to redo the arms.  With a couple plasticard tubes, I managed to create a couple piston-looking things that could go over the brass rod underneath and which were a little beefier looking than the original arms that come in the box.

And then it was on to base coating.  I used mostly P3 and Vallejo Model Colour metallics to do the metal bits, and for the whites, I worked my up, with an undercoat of a medium gray, to Reaper’s Misty Grey (9090), which I find to be one of the most useful colours in my repertoire.  The pink on the lance and shield is also from Reaper; I used their HD Rosy Pink (29853) as an undercoat, Punk Rock Pink (09286) as a base, and Blush Pink (09262) for the highlight.  These are some very vibrant pinks, and have a home in many models in my army.

And then we have the freehand.img_1903.jpg

This is, in my opinion, the most impressive part of this model.  It catches the eye and, along with the weathering, is one component which goes beyond “here’s a model I painted” and really tells a story.  I’m not sure what to say about it; just having nice brushes, the right consistency of paint, and some reference material close by (in this case, a picture of the Black Dragons logo), and a single-colour freehand like this turns out to be less difficult than it looks.  I also freehanded the spiral on the lance, which wasn’t too hard, again, with the right brushes, right consistency, and a steady hand.

Washes add some depth to the model; I used Nuln Oil from GW for most of the wash, and added a little Druchii Violet for the brass bits.  It sounds funny, but I’ve found that a purple shade works really well on brass and gold because colour theory.  Being across the colour wheel from gold, purple shadows make the golden highlights really pop, or something like that.  I don’t know, I’ve never been to art school.  Highlight the metals back up, do a bit of edge highlighting, and we’re ready for weathering!

There were a few techniques I used for this weathering.  For the scratches, what I did was a line of dark colour in the scratch, with a line of highlight below, kind of like this Duncan video.  I also used the sponge technique, applying some dark silver like GW Leadbelcher or P3 Pig Iron using a leftover bit of some pluck foam.  Then I followed up with some P3 Umbral Umber overtop using the same technique.  Both GW’s Typhus Corrosion and Agrax Earthshade can create rust streaks, and Typhus Corrosion is also good for adding dirt and mud effects around the feet and legs of the jack and bottom of the shield, as well as sooty crud on the smokestacks.

When it comes to weathering, placement is key.  Remember how I mentioned earlier that last year’s me kind of slacked off on the mold lines?  Well, here is a nice way to cover that up without worrying about exactly matching the colour at that point on the smooth blend.  That scratch is supposed to be there; it’s weathering…

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Also, weathering tells a story.  I put a lot of weathering on the shield, for example, because it’s a shield.  Blocking blows is what it does, so it’s going to get beaten up.  Also, the lance is going to get scratched up as it penetrates the armour of a Cygnaran warjack, destroying its boiler and wrecking it.  A jack with a punchy fist is going to have scratches on the fist and on the forearm from punching.  Ideally, Khador jacks will have more damage on the front as they face down their foes rather than running away like cowards.  And so on.  I took a while to get into weathering because I like a “clean” look, but even a few scratches can really help the model go tell a story.

I have to admit though, it took a lot of courage to take this freehand that I spent a couple hours working on and which looks great and start randomly stippling crap on.  But in this case, once I got over the fear that I would ruin my wonderful freehand, I came up with something that is so much better and more visually interesting than it was before.  So, my one piece of advice would be to not fear the weathering.  Doing it well can really take things to the next level, and the worst that can happen is you end up repainting something, which in the grand scheme of things is no big deal.

And so, we get the final product.  It turned out a lot better than I anticipated when I started, and while there are some imperfections here and there, I’m very happy with it.  Now, to figure out who to take it with on the table.  Hmmmmmmm, perhaps Vlad1 for the anti-stealth in a rocket list, or maybe Kozlov once the Man-O-War theme comes out?