So you want to go to a model show…

With CapCon 2019 coming up, and with model shows being popular this time of year, I thought it would be a good idea to write a little article about what to expect if it is your first time going to a model show.

Do you want to compete?

While competition is generally a big part of these shows, you can have a lot of fun just spending the day looking at cool models. These competitions can be organized in a number of ways, and if you want to enter into the competition, there are a few things you should keep in mind.

If you want to have a serious shot at winning a medal, you need to do your best work. Take your time and do it right, fixing any mold lines, nub marks, and other imperfections. Also, make sure you get your alignment right if you are building any sort of vehicle where things are supposed to be straight and level. Work on your finish, and make sure any paint and decals don’t have any glaring flaws. These are the sort of basic things that separate the contenders from the also-rans. Finally, don’t rush your build; that can be a recipe for disaster.

If your model doesn’t live up to this high standard and you don’t feel it is competitive with your peers… enter it anyways! There is nothing wrong with putting a model on the table, even if you don’t really have a chance. Never feel like your stuff isn’t competition-worthy. People go to model shows to look at models, and anything looks better than an empty tablecloth. No one should ever make you feel bad because your model isn’t up to their standards.

Read the rules

Most rules are pretty straightforward, but giving them a quick read can help prevent any unnecessary conflict. Don’t put the contest organizers in an awkward position by bringing in something that violates the rules; forcing them to make a decision on whether to stick to the rules or give you an exception because you lugged your models out and they don’t want to upset you isn’t fair. Also, figure out what categories your entries go into in advance. If you have unusually large models or displays, give the organizers a heads up in advance so they don’t struggle to accommodate them on the day of the show. Finally, if you want to compete, reading the rules can help you understand what judges are looking for.

Prepare in advance

So, you have your models built and your schedule cleared. Now, it’s time to make a couple preparations before the day of the show. If you are bringing models, a few days before the show, figure out how you are going to get your models there. Transporting models can be difficult because they can be very delicate, and there will always be people who make it to the model show only to find that a little piece has broken off. Do a little research into model transport solutions. If your models are firmly attached to a base, it can be a lot easier as you can simply stick the base to the bottom of a big tub with magnets or some sort of temporary adhesive. If not, then you have to improvise with things like foam and homemade jigs to hold them in place in the box so they don’t rattle around. Regardless, by packing your models a few days in advance, you can ensure that you have time to arrange smooth transportation to and from the venue.

Also, most shows have entry forms available online in the form of fillable pdf files. Download them, fill them out, and print them in advance. This will help smooth your registration process and give you more time to enjoy the show as you aren’t wasting time filling out forms or trying to figure out which category your models go into. It also helps the show organizers because judges aren’t subjected to the poor handwriting of the entrants. If you can also pre-register or pre-pay, that will save you some time on the day of the show.

Aside from your models and your entry forms, it is a good idea to bring an empty cloth shopping bag or two to make it easier to carry any purchases, raffle prizes, or trophies you are taking home. Also, bring cash. A lot of vendors, silent auctions, and raffles will be cash-only, and not all shows will have an ATM on site. Or, in the case of one show I went to, the ATM might run out of cash partway through the show, which, while a good omen for the vendors, may be frustrating if you need to refuel before another trip around the vendor hall.

Finally, make sure you keep yourself well-fed. Your stomach can seriously affect your mood, and not all shows have great options for food on-site. If you can grab a decent breakfast before the show, that could help keep your energy level up. Consider packing a lunch (or even just some granola bars and a couple pieces of fruit if you are going for a “big breakfast, small lunch” strategy), or research nearby restaurants so you aren’t scrambling to figure it out when your stomach starts grumbling.

The show

heritagecon.jpg

Image shamelessly stolen from HeritageCon

So, you’ve made it to the show, boxes of models in tow. Your first order of business is to head to the registration table and get yourself all squared away with the show organizers. From there, if you brought models, head down to the main exhibition area and plunk them down on the tables. The tables will be organized by category and will generally have pretty clear signage, so make sure you put them in the right spot.

From there, there are going to be two main attractions: the exhibition and the vendors. Feel free to explore both of these at your own pace, but keep in mind that some shows close the exhibition hall for judging, so if you want to take a close look at the models, do that before and after the judging. If you’re in the exhibition hall, take a look around and admire all the work on display. See if there are any new techniques you can learn from the models on display, as taking a close look at a model and trying to figure out how the builder did something is a good source of inspiration. Admire the handiwork on display, but don’t get too worried if someone plunks down an absolutely amazing model in the same category as yours. And if you do see someone do that… complement his model and try to strike up a conversation.

Also, don’t just focus on the categories you like. Take your time and look at all the models on the table. This can help broaden your horizons and maybe pique some interest in subjects you might not think of. What’s the worst that could happen; you could find out that you think gundams are cool?

The vendor hall can offer some good deals on model kits, tools and accessories. A lot of the time, particularly if it is getting later in the day, the vendors don’t really want to pack stuff up again, so feel free to do a little wheeling and dealing with some of the smaller vendors that are just a guy selling his collection. Also, if there are raffles or silent auctions, that can be a source of cheap kits and the like.

Competition

In model competitions, it is vitally important to keep things in perspective. Be humble in victory and gracious in defeat. By entering into the contest, you have agreed to accept the judge’s decisions, so no grumbling about which model should have won. No one likes a sore loser, and being a sore winner is even worse.

If you have a competitive personality, take some time the morning of the show and before the awards ceremony to get into the right headspace. Remember that in the grand scheme of things, awards don’t matter and in a 123 system, they are as much a measure of who else showed up that day as they are a measure of your objective skill. Expect to win nothing, and be pleasantly surprised when you do hear your name called at the awards ceremony. The worst thing you can do is get your self-worth all tangled up in awards and trophies; that way leads to ruin.

I think it is important to keep three things in mind at these shows:

  1. Everyone who is proud enough of their work to show it off at a contest is a winner. Period.
  2. Finding inspiration on the tables is more valuable than any plaque or medal.
  3. The real prizes are the friends you make along the way.

Conclusions

Model shows are a great way to spend a day, and if you play your cards right, you can go home with some sweet deals on model kits, inspiration for your next build, and some new friends. Don’t worry about whether you win or lose, but be happy and humble if you take home some hardware.

Bonus Content: King & Country Russians

A friend had some King & Country collectible figures that got banged up in shipping. They were pretty gnarly, with two broken barrels and numerous chips and scratches. So, I took it upon myself to volunteer to “restore” them. And by “restore” I mean drop them in acetone and repaint them how I want. I scratchbuilt a couple replacement barrels, hit them with Stynylrez, and got to painting. I airbrushed a base coat of green, and followed that up with some additional brushwork to bring up the highlights. Everything else was done by brush, and the metallics were done after the last layer of varnish just to keep them nice and shiny. The faces were a little tricky and didn’t turn out great because the sculpts were kind of dated and beat up, but the owner was happy with how they turned out.